US Coal Exports
Exports Economic Contributions Report
Feb 24 2014

Coal Exports Growing at Vancouver Port (Burnaby News Leader)

Coal shipments rise to 35 per cent of port exports

Port Metro Vancouver recorded nine per cent growth in overall cargo moved in 2013, with increases in coal, grain and container shipments leading the way.

Coal shipments – which have been controversial – climbed 17 per cent to 38.2 million tonnes, split between about 26 million tonnes of steelmaking coal and 12 million tonnes of thermal coal.

The port’s coal shipping capacity is expected to climb with a pending expansion in North Vancouver and, potentially a new terminal at Fraser Surrey Docks that has hit strong opposition.

Coal now makes up 35 per cent of port exports.

Container shipments were up four per cent in 2013 to 2.83 million containers.

Port Metro CEO Robin Silvester said that gain stems from more containerized grain exports and increased imports of consumer products to Canada to meet rising consumer demand.

It’s close to the port’s long-term expectation of five per cent a year overall container growth that Silvester said is the basis for the proposed Terminal 2 expansion at Deltaport.

“The growth we’ve been expecting is coming to pass and underlining the importance of the infrastructure strategy we’ve been working on with our federal and provincial partners,” Silvester said.

One of the most visible infrastructure upgrades – the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor work to build eight railway overpasses in Delta, Surrey and Langley – should be finished within a year, he said.

The overpasses will reduce road congestion from trains blocking level crossings that would otherwise worsen as port traffic grows. They’ll also reduce or eliminate train whistling.

Silvester said the port projects a doubling of container shipments over the next 15 years or so and up to 30 per cent growth in grain handling.

He said last year’s growth of 11 million tonnes of cargo – to a record 135 million tonnes overall – was the equivalent of adding an entire medium-sized port in Metro Vancouver.

He said the port supports 60,000 jobs in the Lower Mainland that earn 50 per cent more than the average wage.

Slightly fewer oil tankers loaded at Kinder Morgan’s Westridge Terminal in Burnaby – 48 in 2013 compared to 50 in 2012.

Oil tanker visits are expected to soar to 400 per year if the Trans Mountain pipeline twinning proceeds.

Silvester said the drop in oil exports was because refineries in Washington State took more crude via a branch of the pipeline that serves them, leaving less for Kinder Morgan to export.

More than 812,000 cruise ship passengers visited Vancouver – a 22 per cent increase – and the total number of cruise ships visiting climbed to 235.

See article here.

  • “The fact that we’re no longer in the age of energy scarcity – that we’re in the age of energy abundance – positions the United States in a totally different place. This gives access to affordable, reliable energy in the United States, and gives the U.S. a major competitive advantage.”
    – Dave Banks, Special Assistant to President Donald Trump for International Energy, June 2017
  • “It is in the national interest to promote clean and safe development of our Nation's vast energy resources, while at the same time avoiding regulatory burdens that unnecessarily encumber energy production, constrain economic growth, and prevent job creation. Moreover, the prudent development of these natural resources is essential to ensuring the Nation's geopolitical security.”
    – Executive Order on Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth, March 28, 2017
  • “Historically, U.S. companies seeking to expand their revenues focused first on increasing their number and share of U.S customers. For years, this focus served as a winning strategy for many of the most successful U.S. companies. Today, global economic trends make clear that successful companies are those that reach and sell to consumers outside U.S. borders and around the globe.”
    — 2011 National Export Strategy, U.S. Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee
  • “Federal regulatory agencies should not require climate change studies in the course of their permitting processes for proposed facilities. Coal will be consumed around the world regardless of U.S. trade policy. The only question is whether the coal is produced here in North America, where environmental standards are high, or elsewhere.”
    — U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski, January 7, 2014
  • “At present 19% of the world’s population, 1.3 billion people, lack access to electricity and on New Policy Scenario projections there will still be 1 billion people without such access in 2030. To meet the UN Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty by 2015, 395 million more people need access to electricity. There is a strong correlation between electrification and improvement in the United Nations’ Human Development Index.”
    — International Energy Agency, Coal Industry Advisory Board
  • “Access to electricity is strongly correlated with every measurable indicator of human development”
    — Berkeley Science Review, 2008

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